Saturday, July 6, 2019

History - A Special Glance Into the Past


If you want to give your children/students—and yourself—a sample of what radio used to be like, click over to Heirloom Radio.  John Lovering has captured over 50,000 radio plays. Personally, I am always impressed at the evolution of audio and video production over the years.


Sunday, June 23, 2019

The Road to Character

I just finished reading NYTimes columnist David Brook's book The Road to Character. Check it out of your local library and at least read Chapter 10—the last chapter. It has such a wonderful outlook on the past, generational changes, and how to live your life. Here are a few precious quotes from that chapter:

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“The things that lead us astray are short-term—lust, fear, vanity, gluttony. The things we call character endure over the long-term—courage, honesty, humility.”

“First there was the Greatest Generation, those members were self-sacrificing, self-effacing, and community-minded. Then along came the 1960s and the Baby Boomers, who were narcissistic, self-expressive, selfish, and morally lax.”

“Some parents unconsciously regard their children as something like an art project, to be crafted through mental and emotional engineering. There is some parental narcissism here, the insistence that your children go to colleges and lead lives that will give the parents status and pleasure. Children who are uncertain of their parents’ love develop a voracious hunger for it. This conditional love is like acid that dissolves children’s internal criteria, their capacity to make their own decisions about their own interests, careers, marriages, and life in general.”

“Humility is an awareness that your individual talents alone are inadequate to the tasks that have been assigned to you. Humility reminds you that you are not the center of the universe, but you serve a larger order.”

“Joy is not produced because others praise you. Joy emanates unbidden and unforced. Joy comes as a gift when you least expect it. At those fleeting moments you know why you were put here and what truth you serve.”

Sunday, June 9, 2019

Sapiens


The book Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari has been on the NYTimes BestSellers List for 72 weeks, and if you read it, you will understand why. It is now on my top best read list. The video below gives a quick, excellent introduction to the book.




Sunday, May 26, 2019

Parents Who Do 5 Things – Most Successful Kids


1.     They role model volunteering
2.     They teach kids how to cook
3.     They steer teens away from caffeine
4.     They help their kids become strong readers and writers
5.     They don't give up on exposing kids to the right things



Monday, May 13, 2019

Montessori Applied to Children at Risk

Children with learning differences have always held a special place in my heart. It is partly what makes Dr. Joyce Pickering's new book Montessori Strategies forChildren with Learning Differences so special. I highly recommend this book to all educators and parents who want to learn more about Montessori education and working with children who learn  differently.


In 1990 Dr. Pickering—a dear friend and colleague of mine—became the Executive Director of the Shelton School and Evaluation Center in Dallas, TX. At that time, the school had an enrollment of 170 children. Dr. Pickering directed the school for 20 years, and in 2010, when the school was serving 700 children, she transitioned to the Shelton Outreach Department with a focus on the School’s Montessori Applied to Children At Risk (MACAR) teacher-training program. Shelton now has an enrollment of over 900 children and is the largest school in the world for children with dyslexia and other learning differences.

Monday, April 29, 2019

Want to Feel More Grateful?

"This simple trick will help. You've heard about the value of counting our blessings, right? If you just add up all the good things in your life, the reasoning goes, you'll deepen your gratitude and boost your well-being. And that’s true.
 But another technique — one that relies less on addition and more on subtraction — is potentially even more effective.
 It's all explained in the latest Pinkcast, a 102-second video that you can watch by clicking here."              From Daniel Pink, author of the great book When.